Grand Canyon Arizona Engagement Proposal Photography

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Do you need at Grand Canyon engagement photographer?

I remember the very first time that someone asked me to shoot a surprise engagement at Grand Canyon. The idea of it was exciting to me and logistically possible but I was nervous about all of the variables.  We arranged the location and I had a very difficult time finding them at first. I’d chosen a location that might be more visited than some other locations and every couple that walked by I thought was them until these two people came my way and I didn’t have to know what they were wearing, I just knew. The body language said it all, this was the couple and any minute he would drop to one knee and the surprise engagement happening, right there on the edge of Grand Canyon.

By now, I’ve photographed dozens of engagements at Grand Canyon. I have a better system in place than that vey first one and have shot so many surprise proposals at Grand Canyon now that I would consider it my specialty.  Every proposal is different and every experience should be special and unique. I help create that experience. I moved to Grand Canyon almost 10 years ago and being a local I have a inside look on the best locations, knowing how the light will be at sunrise or sunset and even some secret locations. I have been helping people in love plan their surprise engagement proposal for years.

What should you know in order to plan your surprise engagement in Arizona:

  1. The best time to get epic Grand Canyon engagement photos is one hour before sunset or 5 minutes before sunrise. If there are clouds they might turn pink but only for a few minutes in the 7 minutes before sunrise or the few minutes after
  2.  Although every viewpoint at Grand Canyon is great for sunset or sunrise, not every view point works well for portraiture. The desert is stark and the sun can be harsh as it lowers to the horizon line. The light changes every season and I will scout the light for each session and choose the perfect location.
  3. Crowds. After the 2016 NPS “Find Your Park” Centennial year, the parks got very popular and the visitation hasn’t stopped. It’s important to find a location that is visited but that is not a “sunset” spot where other Grand Canyon visitors pack in and park it to watch the sunset. It can be hard to host this life changing event in a place like this but I blend in as a tourist and snap into action when you drop to one knee.

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